in

Hip-Hop’s Most Impactful Artists/Black Music Executives

Hip-Hop’s Most Impactful Artists/Black Music Executives
Announcement


50 Cent

50 Cent
Image Credit: Gilbert Flores/Variety via Getty Images

Going from the brink of death to the executive suite is a rare transition, but one 50 Cent made seem effortless. Born and raised in South Jamaica, Queens, 50, born Curtis Jackson, began rapping as a teen before running afoul of the law. After serving time at a boot camp for drug possession, Fif returned to the streets, eager to make a soft landing in the music business. Coming under the mentorship of Run D.M.C. member Jam Master Jay during the mid ’90s, Fif learned the ins and outs of songwriting during his tenure working with the legendary DJ’s imprint JMJ Records. 

Releasing his first single “The Glow / The Hit” on JMJ, the rapper eventually left the label, signing on with production duo Trackmasters through Columbia Records. Building a buzz with his controversial single “How to Rob,” Fif recorded his intended debut album Power of the Dollar, but was dropped from the label in 2000 shortly after being shot multiple times during an ambush attack in Queens.

Recovering from his wounds, the rapper teamed up with manager and executive Sha Money XL and hit the studio with a vengeance, flooding the mixtape circuit with freestyles and loose songs the following year. Releasing his mixtape Guess Who’s Back? in 2002, Fif introduced his group G-Unit featuring rappers and fellow Southside natives Tony Yayo and Lloyd Banks on his breakout mixtape 50 Cent Is the Future. Quickly becoming the hottest unsigned artist and crew in New York, 50 and G-Unit’s stock peaked with the release of their No Mercy, No Fear and God’s Plan mixtapes later that year. Securing a $1 million record deal with Shady Records through Aftermath Entertainment, 50 Cent released his debut album Get Rich or Die Tryin’ in February 2003.

Debuting at No. 1 on the Billboard 200, the album sold 872,000 copies in its first four days, among the biggest first-week sales returns in the history of music. Producing multiple chart-topping singles, Get Rich or Die Tryin’ sold nine million copies in the U.S. and remains his best-selling album. Founding G-Unit Records through Interscope, 50 signed Lloyd Banks, Tony Yayo, and Tennessee rapper Young Buck to the label, releasing G-Unit’s debut album Beg for Mercy in November 2003. The album, which saw Young Buck filling in for an incarcerated Tony Yayo, also debuted at No. 1 on Billboard and was certified quadruple platinum.

2004 saw Fif and G-Unit place their focus on Lloyd Banks and Young Buck’s solo debuts, both of which arrived that summer. In late July, Lloyd Banks’ The Hunger for More hit the charts at No. 1 with nearly half a million copies sold in its first week and was certified Platinum. Less than a month later, Young Buck’s Straight Outta Cashville opened at No. 3 on the Billboard 200 with 261,000 copies sold and was also certified Platinum. West Coast rapper The Game was added as a member of G-Unit, an acquisition that proved profitable for Fif, as the Aftermath signee’s debut album The Documentary skyrocketed to the top of the charts, with 586,000 units in its first week on its way to double Platinum status. 

However, he would be jettisoned from the label months later amid internal friction between he, Fif and other G-Unit members. More than a year removed from the release of his debut, Fif returned in March 2005 with The Massacre, which set a record for the most copies sold in an abbreviated sales cycle with 1.14 million copies sold in four days. Shortly after the album’s release, he became the first solo artist of any genre to have three songs chart in the Top 5 of the Billboard Hot 100 simultaneously. 

The Massacre would sell six million units in the U.S., placing him among the greatest selling Hip-Hop artists of all-time in two years. Later that year, G-Unit Records released the soundtrack to Get Rich or Die Tryin’, the 2005 film loosely based on his life, selling 320,000 copies in the first week and receiving Platinum certification.

Having been released from prison following multiple arrests during the height of G-Unit’s fame, Yayo was the last of the label’s core artists to drop an album, with Thoughts of a Predicate Felon debuting at No. 2 on the album chart and yielding a Gold plaque. Looking to expand the roster during the latter half of the ’00s, Fif recruited the likes of Ma$e, Lil Scrappy, Freeway, and others to join the label, with varying results. He also signed  M.O.P., Spider Loc, 40 Glocc and Young Hot Rod in an attempt to capitalize on their potential fanfare. 

The next few years saw Lloyd Banks and Young Buck each release their sophomore albums, with Banks’ Rotten Apple arriving in 2006, and Buck’s Buck the World coming the year after. In September 2007, 50 released his third studio album Curtis, which lost a publicized sales battle with Kanye West, but moved just short of 700,000 copies in its opening week. The album, which surpassed one million units sold by year’s end, marked the rapper’s third consecutive Platinum plaque and the label’s eighth overall. Over the following decade, Fif and the label released albums from G-Unit, Lloyd Banks, and himself before disbanding in 2018 as a group. G-Unit Records remains active, but with 50 Cent as the lone known artist currently on the label.



Source link

Announcement

What do you think?

Written by Ebonicles

Announcement
Announcement

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Announcement
Fake Black History Tweets Guaranteed To Make You LOL

Fake Black History Tweets Guaranteed To Make You LOL

What is Gullah Geechee food and how do you make it?

What is Gullah Geechee food and how do you make it?